Saturday November 22: Anarchy and 24

Advanced Series
Title: The Price of Anarchy (Game Theory)
Speaker: Steven Kwon
Time & Date: 2 pm – 3 pm, Saturday November 22
Location: Princeton Public Library, Story Room (third floor)
Abstract:
We all like being able to choose what we do in life, based on what we feel will be best for us. However, is this actually the most optimal for us, or would it be better if one unbiased person told everyone what to do? Join us this week as we learn how game theory can show that sometimes, our freedom of choice can act against us. This phenomenon, which is described by mathematicians as “the price of anarchy,” appears both theoretically and in the real world today. Through several mathematical games, including the famous “Prisoner’s Dilemma,” we will learn exactly how high the price of anarchy can be.
Chili peppers difficulty: 2 out of 4
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Recreational Series
Title: The Game of 24
Leader: Andy Loo
Time & Date: 3:14 pm – 4 pm, Saturday November 22
Location: Princeton Public Library, Story Room (third floor)
Description: We will play the mathematical card game “24,” looking at a couple of rather tricky examples.
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Saturday November 8: Graph Theory and Pool Party

Advanced Series

Title: Graph Theory

Speaker: Leila Clark

Time & Date: 2 pm – 3 pm, Saturday November 8

Location: Princeton Public Library, Story Room (third floor)

Abstract:
We’ll study the fundamentals of graph theory, which is a subset of math that focuses on mathematical structures called ‘graphs’. We’ll look at two simple-to-understand but difficult-to-solve problems involving friends, parties, towns and bridges, and in doing so explore how graphs can be helpful in understanding the world around us.

Chili peppers difficulty: 1.5 out of 4

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Recreational Series

Title: Pool Party

Leader: Justin Lanier

Time & Date: 3:14 pm – 4 pm, Saturday November 8

Location: Princeton Public Library, Story Room (third floor)

Description: Mathematicians have invented many puzzles and problems inspired by the game of pool. Can you hit a shot that will come back to where it started? Can you predict which pocket a ball will go into? Many such problems remain unsolved, and math’s most prestigious prize—the Fields Medal—was just awarded to two mathematicians who study them. Come, learn their stories, and try some pool puzzles yourself!